Multifaceted Menstruation Interdisciplinary Workshop
Nov
22
9:30 AM09:30

Multifaceted Menstruation Interdisciplinary Workshop

  • James Room (Room 418), Barnard Hall, Barnard College (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please join the Menstrual Health and Gender Justice Working Group, the Center for the Study of Social Difference, and the Institute for the Study of Human Rights for an interdisciplinary workshop on November 22, 2019 entitled "Multifaceted Menstruation".

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Should You Be Worried about Racialization of Precision Medicine? Insights from Asia and North America
Dec
4
5:00 PM17:00

Should You Be Worried about Racialization of Precision Medicine? Insights from Asia and North America

The Precision Medicine: Ethics, Politics, and Culture Project welcomes Dr. Shirley Sun (Nanyang Technological University) to give a talk on “Should You Be Worried about Racialization of Precision Medicine? Insights from Asia and North America.”

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The Hosting State and Its Restless Guests: Refugee Education, Migration and Regional Peace in the Global South
Oct
24
to Oct 25

The Hosting State and Its Restless Guests: Refugee Education, Migration and Regional Peace in the Global South

  • James Room, Barnard Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The 6th Georg Arnhold Symposium will explore the relationship between refugee hosting and refugee education in large refugee hosting states in the Global South in light of global policy shifts that attempt to stem secondary movement.

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#MeToo: One Year After Christine Blasey Ford
Oct
9
5:30 PM17:30

#MeToo: One Year After Christine Blasey Ford

Join us for a lively discussion of the #Me Too movement, with contributors to Indelible in the Hippocampus: Writings from the Me Too Movement. Moderated by Davia Temin.

We regret the conflict with Yom Kippur and will share documentation of the event at a later date and continue the important #MeToo conversation.

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Period. End of Sentence. Film Screening and Critical Panel
Sep
26
6:00 PM18:00

Period. End of Sentence. Film Screening and Critical Panel

Please join the Menstrual Health and Gender Justice Working Group for a screening of 'PERIOD. End of Sentence,' the Oscar-winning documentary about menstruation. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion.


Panelists include:

Lauren Houghton, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Shobita Parthasarathy, Professor of Public Policy at University of Michigan's Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy

Emily Hoppes, Program and Partnerships Coordinator at Huru International

While the film focuses on the production of pads, ensuring menstrual health requires reaching far beyond that. Our panel will address critical questions related to menstrual stigma, agency, and power relations. How can we use the current attention to menstruation to bring about transformative change that advances gender justice?

Co-sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Human Rights and the Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality

Event Contact Information:
Michelle Chouinard
mc4225@columbia.edu

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Ecologies of Remembrance: The Material Afterlives of Unidentified Death along the Central Mediterranean Migration Route
Sep
11
to Sep 12

Ecologies of Remembrance: The Material Afterlives of Unidentified Death along the Central Mediterranean Migration Route

  • Sulzberger Parlor, Barnard Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The news media around the Mediterranean are frequently dominated by the aftermath of maritime disasters in which dozens, sometimes hundreds of migrants die on the perilous crossing to southern Italy from North Africa. Whilst migrant death is a recurring subject in academic study and journalism, scarcely any research is carried out on the ground into the material and symbolic treatment of unidentified human remains. Yet the social afterlife of human remains is of immense importance in the case of migrant deaths because of the ways in which they bring into focus the webs of relations in which migrants are caught, bringing together transnational kinship networks, local landscapes, local communities and solidarity groups and wider political motivations and actions.

How do people dispose of the anonymous remains of such disasters? What kinds of social relationships and connections are generated by the process? What are their motivations and emotional involvements of the people concerned? And what are the historical resonances of these unique and complex mortuary practices? What are the political consequences of the sacralization of the loss of human life juxtaposed against the normalization of the bare life existence of displaced people? We bring together research papers on works of tracing, forensic investigation, and burial, connecting metropolitan centers with Tunisia, Sicily, Lampedusa and Calabria. This way, we intend our conference to demonstrate the entanglements between transnational kin networks, local landscapes and communities, religious and solidarity groups, and national and international political discourses. Through the exploration of mourning without kin, this conference will follow the trail of sorrow and justice, local ritual appeasing and burial of migrant remains. 

Schedule:

Wednesday, September 11, 2019
3:30PM | Panel I
AFTERLIVES OF UNIDENTIFIED DEATH ALONG THE MIGRANT ROUTE
Agnès S. Callamard, Vanessa Grotti, Yannis Hamilakis, Matthew Engelke

6:30PM | Film Screening
IT WILL BE CHAOS
with filmmakers Lorena Luciano & Filippo Piscopo

Thursday, September 12, 2019
9:00AM | Panel II
BODIES AND LANDSCAPES
Marc, Brightman, Osman Balkan, Sarah Wagner

11:00AM | Panel III
VICISSITUDES OF REMAINS
Noar Ben-Yehoyada, Valentina Zagaria, Zoë Crossland

1:30PM | Panel IV
MOBILIZATION, CONTESTATION, ADVOCACY
J.C. Salyer, Leah Zamore

3:30PM | Concluding Discussion
Zoë Crossland, Brian Boyd, Sarah Wagner, Vanessa Grotti

 
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Participants:

Osman Balkan (Swathmore College)
Naor Ben-Yehoyada (Anthropology, Columbia)
Brian Boyd (Anthropology, Columbia)
Marc Brightman (University of Bologna)
Agnès S. Callamard (Columbia, UN-OHCHR)
Zoë Crossland (Anthropology, Columbia)
Matthew Engelke (Religion, Columbia)
Vanessa Grotti (European University Institute)
Yannis Hamilakis (Anthropology, Brown)
Lorena Luciano (Director, It Will Be Chaos)
Filippo Piscopo (Director, It Will Be Chaos)
J.C. Salyer (Anthropology and Human Rights, Barnard)
Sarah Wagner (Anthropology, George Washington University)
Valentina Zagaria (London School of Economics)
Leah Zamore (Center for International Cooperation, NYU)

The Conference is co-sponsored by the ISERP Conference Funding Grant, the Faculty Fellowship Program at the Heyman Center for the Humanities, The Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life, the Anthropology Department, the CSSD Working Group on Migrant Personhood and Rights: A Crisis of Recognition, the Columbia Center for Archaeology, and the Barnard Human Rights Program. It continues a Wenner-Gren funded research project co-directed by Vanessa Grotti and Marc Brightman, in which Naor Ben-Yehoyada is collaborating.

Register here

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Women Mobilizing Memory: Arts of Intervention
Jun
26
9:30 AM09:30

Women Mobilizing Memory: Arts of Intervention

The pop-up exhibition “Arts of Intervention” brings together an international group of artists connected to the working group on “Women Mobilizing Memory” of Columbia University’s Center for the Study of Social Difference in the context of the Third Annual Memory Studies Association Conference in Madrid, June, 2019.

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Voices on the Ground: Human Rights Defenders Workshop
Jun
25
8:30 AM08:30

Voices on the Ground: Human Rights Defenders Workshop

Reframing Gendered Violence Human Rights Defenders Workshop “Voices on the Ground” in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

The Papua New Guinea National Research Institute (PNG NRI) Building Safer Communities Program and the Center for the Study of Social Difference, Columbia University, are conducting a workshop on Reframing Gendered Violence in Port Moresby. The Reframing Gendered Violence workshop in Port Moresby stems from the Center for the Study of Social Difference’s annual seminar that is conducted at the Columbia University in New York. This program brings speakers to talk about how gender based violence is understood and addressed in different contexts.

“Part of CSSD’s Women Creating Change projects, the Reframing Gendered Violence working group engages critically with the terms, assumptions, and policies that have underwritten this unprecedented outpouring of attention. When invoked in the United Nations and used to shape international policy, VAW and GBV are often assumed to have stable meanings, yet they do not. What do different parties mean when they talk of violence against women or of gender-based violence? Do they focus primarily on sexual violence, occurring in domestic settings? What is left out when the problem is framed in this way, and whose interests are served by such a framing?” (Europe Journal, 2017). The focus of the workshop is on the recently launched ‘Human Rights Defenders’ Association. Therefore, the aim of the workshop is to create a space where the human rights defenders can tell their own stories.

The theme of the workshop is ‘Voices on the ground,’ to encourage participation and telling of the story by the Human Rights Defenders.

Briefly, the HRDs are community leaders based in Port Moresby who were trained by UNWomen to become human rights defenders. Most were community activists well before they were trained and named as HRDs. Many wear ‘different hats’, as village courts officials, community mobilisers, and justice community leaders apart from HRD. Despite many challenges, these community leaders have been preventing and addressing human rights issues, including gender based violence in their communities for many years. There are approximately 230 Port Moresby based HRDs.

Some of the discussion points include:

• HRD’s work before they were recognized and trained by UNWomen?

• What are some preventive and response method they use to address GBV in their communities?

• How would they describe themselves before, compared to now?

• What are some challenges they face in their communities?

• What can we learn from the experiences of HRDs?

The NRI will be documenting the stories of the HRD and submitting a joint publication with the Center for the Study of Social Difference, Columbia University. The learnings from this workshop, will capture the HRD’s stories and how they prevent and address GBV within their communities.

Workshop speakers include:

Fiona Hukula
Mary Fairo
Paige West
Agnes Rau
Linda Tule
Khanu Gibson
Cathy Amalu
Sabet Peter
Janet Awe
Madlin Po’o
Sala Samuel
Margaret Au



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Women CLAP BACK: Music and the Arts
Apr
16
6:15 PM18:15

Women CLAP BACK: Music and the Arts

  • Lifetime Screening Room | 511 Dodge Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Center for the Study of Social Difference
is proud to co-sponsor:

Women CLAP BACK: Music and the Arts

Women CLAP BACK: Music and the Arts is a series of programmed events featuring woman-identified speakers working on the fringes of music and the arts that speak about their interventions in the White and patriarchal dynamics of their fields. The goal of CLAP BACK is to foster cross-disciplinary conversation among musicians, composers, multimedia artists, playwrights, bloggers, academics, and activists. The inaugural CLAP BACK  premiered at The New School / Eugene Lang College in April 2016.

This second event will feature film director and visual artist James Spooner, who directed 2003's Afropunk: The Rock n' Roll Experience, a groundbreaking independent film that sparked a global movement. Centered on the experiences of black rock, punk and hardcore musicians in New York City, it spearheaded a nationwide conversation on black artists within the DIY (Do-it-Yourself) underground music scenes. Most importantly, it highlighted the experiences of black women who successfully navigated their gender and ethnocultural status while actively participating within these white-centric and male-dominated genres and cultures that have historically been resistant to marginalized communities. This event, free and open to the public will include women who were featured in the 2003 documentary, as well as young women of color who are currently involved in the New York punk and hardcore scenes. 

At this event, we will screen the 70-minute documentary and Spooner will give a presentation on the making of the documentary, as well as discuss the cultural shift that has happened in the 15+ years since the initial release. We will also moderate a panel of 3-4 women on their experiences as artists within the underground music scenes.

Register here.

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Campus ERA Day: Viewing Party
Apr
15
6:00 PM18:00

Campus ERA Day: Viewing Party

Join CSSD’s Women Creating Change for a livestream viewing party to celebrate Campus ERA Day. We will be livestreaming the event and interacting with panelists. The goal of this event is to spread awareness of and to gain support for the reviatlized push to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment to the United States Constitution. In 1923, the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was introduced in Congress to ensure that women were equal under the law and prevent sex-based discrimination. Almost one hundrd years later, the United States Constitution still does not guarantee equal rights for women!

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Apr
15
12:00 PM12:00

"Donde antes tú ahora el vacío.": Mourning the Absent Bodies of the US-Mexico border in Sara Uribe’s Antígona González with Marianne Hirsch

  • Heyman Center for the Humanities, Common Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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On Monday April 15, The Center for the Study of Social Difference (CSSD) co-sponsors “Donde antes tú ahora el vacío.”: Mourning the Absent Bodies of the US-Mexico border in Sara Uribe’s Antígona González with CSSD Director Marianne Hirsch.

Organized by the The Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, the event will bring together Miguel Alirangues Lopez (PHD Candidate at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) and Marianne Hirsch (Columbia University) in conversation, discussing Lopez’s work on Sara Uribe’s Antígona González.

Mexican poet Sara Uribe is one of the most remarkable voices of her generation. Her influential work Antígona González (2012) is the story of a woman who searches for the body of her missing brother on the US-Mexico border, with the determination to bury him, just like Sophocles’ classical heroine. Miguel Alirangues (PhD Candidate at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) and Marianne Hirsch (Columbia University) will be in conversation, commenting on Uribe’s discursive strategies to mourn the effects of generalized violence in the context of the Mexican Drug War.

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Apr
11
6:00 PM18:00

The Managed Body: Book Talk with Chris Bobel

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”The Managed Body" productively complicates ‘menstrual hygiene management’ (MHM)—a growing social movement to support menstruating girls in the Global South. Bobel offers an invested critique of the complicated discourses of MHM including its conceptual and practical links with the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) development sector, human rights and ‘the girling of development.’ Drawing on analysis of in-depth interviews, participant observations and the digital materials of NGOs and social businesses, Bobel shows how MHM frames problems and solutions to capture attention and direct resources to this highly-tabooed topic. She asserts that MHM organizations often inadvertently rely upon weak evidence and spectacularized representations to make the claim of a ‘hygienic crisis’ that authorizes rescue. And, she argues, the largely product-based solutions that follow fail to challenge the social construction of the menstrual body as dirty and in need of concealment. While cast as fundamental to preserving girls’ dignity, MHM prioritizes ‘technological fixes’ that teach girls to discipline their developing bodies vis a vis consumer culture, a move that actually accommodates more than it resists the core problem of menstrual stigma.

Bobel is an associate professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston, and is a faculty fellow in the MHGJ working group. You can read more about Bobel and view selected publications here.


Books will be available for purchase.
Food will be provided.

Event Contact Information: 
Michelle Chouinard
mc4225@columbia.edu

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Apr
10
6:30 PM18:30

A Salon in Celebration of Manu Karuka’s New Book: Empire's Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad

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Please join CSSD working group Racial Capitalism for a salon in celebration of Manu Karuka’s new book Empire's Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad (University of California Press, 2019)

This event will be moderated by CSSD project director Jack Halberstam in conversation with Manu Karuka, Audra Simpson, Sandy Grande, and Karl Jacoby.

The event is free and open to the public.

Additional support provided by the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality (IRWGS) at Columbia University; and the American Studies Program at Barnard College.

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Apr
10
9:00 AM09:00

Unpayable Still: Debt in a Global Context

The Center for the Study of Social Difference working group Unpayable Debt: Capital, Violence, and the New Global Economy presents its closing conference:

Unpayable Still: Debt in a Global Context

This day-long conference invites sociologists, anthropologists, economists, and artists, to investigate the global history of capitalism as a racialized and gendered formation.

Click here to watch the conference keynote lecture from Professor Silvia Federici (Hofstra University)

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Schedule:

9:00-9:15AM
OPENING REMARKS
Sarah Muir and Frances Negrón-Muntaner, co-directors

9:15-10:30AM
DEBT AS GOVERNANCE
Andrew Ross, New York University | “Can’t Pay, Won’t Pay”
Miriam Muniz, University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras | “Taken Island/Isla Tomada”
Caitlin Zaloom, New York University | “Priceless Poential: Middle Class Life and Student Debt in American Families”

10:45-12:00PM
REIMAGINING DEBT
Max Haiven , Lakehead University | “The Revenge of Debt or the Debt of Revenge? Artists Working with Wampum and Money”
Aleksandra Perisic, University of Miami | “Trans-Atlantic Indebtedness in the Literary Imagination”
Frances Negrón-Muntaner, Columbia University | “ Valor y Cambio Project: Art, Narrative, and Decolonial Joy”

12:15-1:30PM
NO MORE DEBT
Soo-Young Kim, Princeton University | “Austerity turns Debt into a Crisis”
Jerome Roos, London School of Economics | “A Very Brief History of Sovereign Default”
Sarah Muir, City University of New York | “Eternal Debt? Long-term Experiences of Debt and Default in Argentina”

1:30-2:30PM
LUNCH BREAK

3:00-4:30PM
CLOSING KEYNOTE | Rm 201 Casa Hispanica , 612 W 116th Street
Silvia Federici, Hofstra University | “Women, Microcredit, and Debt: A Feminist Perspective”

4:30-5:30PM
RECEPTION | Rm 201 Casa Hispanica , 612 W 116th Street

Special thanks to our cosponsor the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures (LAIC).

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Apr
5
3:00 PM15:00

Art Theft and Restitution

  • East Gallery - Buell Hall (Maison Francaise) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A round-table with Ariella Azoulay (Professor of Modern Culture and Media Studies, and Comparative Literature, Brown University), Souleymane Bachir Diagne (Professor of French and Philosophy, and Director of the Institute for African Studies, Columbia University) and Brian Wallis (Curator, The Walther Collection), Moderated by Marianne Hirsch and Andreas Huyssen.

Co-Sponsors: University Seminar on Cultural Memory, Columbia Center for the Study of Social Difference, Maison Francaise.


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Apr
5
9:30 AM09:30

#Startup Columbia Festival

Innovations in Social Justice: Columbia Alumni who are Changing the World 

The Center for the Study of Social Difference’s Women Creating Change is proud to cosponor this year’s #Startup Columbia Festival. We have quite a line up of female founders and alumnae innovators who are solving problems around the globe to make a better world.  The list includes:

  • Alice Bosley '17SIPA who is turning refugees into founders at her incubator in Iraq

  • Katherine Katcher '07CC who is mitigating the effects of mass incarceration with Root & Rebound 

  • Dr. Courtney Cogburn, School of Social Work who is changing perspectives on unconscious racial bias 

  • Shivani Siroya '07MPH is giving access to credit to bottom-of-the-pyramid consumers in developing countries

  • Anne Williams-Isom '91LAW who is running the Harlem Children's Zone helping to create a model to eradicate systemic poverty

  • Emmy-award winner Abby Disney '98 GSAS who will discuss this week's premiere of Women, War, & Peace, four never-before-told stories about the women who risked their lives for peace, changing history in the process

Complimentary tickets will be offered to affiliates of the Columbia Center for the Study of Social Difference or active members of the Women Creating Change Leadership Council.  You can request your tickets by emailing cm3014@columbia.edu with "WCC" in the subject line.

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Mar
25
4:15 PM16:15

Transnational Feminist Futures

Center for the Study of Social Difference co-sponsors the annual Transnational Feminist Futures roundtable conversation. This event, presented by  the Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality will bring together scholars and activists for a roundtable conversation on transnational feminist theorizing and activism.

Speakers:

Professors Laura Briggs (UMASS-Amherst), Paige West (Columbia/ Barnard College), Zillah Eisenstein (Ithaca College), Premilla Nadasen (Barnard College), and Linda Oalican (Damayan Migrant Workers Association).

Moderator: Selina Makana, Postdoctoral Fellow, Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality.

Participants will explore the ways that transnational feminist theorizing and practices transform and reimagine contestations over issues such as human rights, constructions of patriarchies, and inclusionary/exclusionary practices of race, sexuality, and class.

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Mar
21
6:00 PM18:00

Women Carrying Memory: Stateless Figures

  • Columbia University's Studio-X Istanbul (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Marianne Hirsch
William Peterfield Trent Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

Date: Thursday, March 21, 2019
Time: 6:00 pm
 Location: Columbia University's Studio-X Istanbul
         Meclis-i Mebusan Caddesi 35A Salıpazarı
 

*There will be simultaneous translation during the event. 
               *Etkinlik sırasında İngilizce-Türkçe simultane çeviri yapılacaktır.  
   

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On March 21, Columbia Global Centers | Istanbul will host Marianne Hirsch, William Peterfield Trent Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and Professor in the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality, in conversation with Ayşe Gül Altınay, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Sabancı University and Aylin Vartanyan, Lecturer at Bogazici University. This event is organized in collaboration with SU Gender, Hrant Dink Foundation, and Friedrich-Ebert-Foundation. There will be simultaneous translation during the event.

About the Talk 
Responding to the renewed monumentality of memory museums, memorials and commemorative rituals that perpetuate nationalism and ethnocentrism, this talk looks at two recent memorial projects by feminist diasporic artists from different parts of the world [Mirta Kupferminc and Wangechi Muthu] projects that explore the vicissitudes and vulnerabilities of exile and statelessness. It suggests that stateless memory can open up the possibility of imagining alternative relationships between contemporary subjects and citizenship, national belonging, and home, as well as alternate temporalities of becoming. 

Professor Marianne Hirsch writes about the transmission of memories of violence across generations, combining feminist theory with memory studies in global perspective. Her recent books include The Generation of Postmemory: Writing and Visual Culture After the Holocaust (2012), Ghosts of Home: The Afterlife of Czernowitz in Jewish Memory (2010), co-authored with Leo Spitzer, and two volumes forthcoming this year: the co-edited Women Mobilizing Memory and the co-authored School Photos in Liquid Time. The director of Columbia University’s Center for the Study of Social Difference, Hirsch teaches Comparative Literature and Gender Studies at Columbia.

Hafızayı Taşıyan Kadınlar: Vatansız Figürler
Columbia Üniversitesi Toplumsal Farklılık Çalışmaları Merkezi direktörü Profesör Marianne Hirsch'ü "Hafızayı Taşıyan Kadınlar: Vatansız Figürler" başlıklı konuşmasıyla 21 Mart Perşembe akşamı Studio-X Istanbul'da ağırlıyoruz. Hrant Dink Vakfı, Sabancı Üniversitesi Toplumsal Cinsiyet ve Mükemmeliyet Merkezi ve Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung Derneği ile ortak olarak düzenlediğimiz bu etkinlikte, Sabancı Üniversitesi'nden Doç. Dr. Ayşe Gül Altınay ve Boğaziçi Üniversitesi'nden Öğretim Görevlisi Aylin Vartanyan da tartışmacı olarak bizlerle birlikte olacaklar. Etkinlik boyunca simultane çeviri sağlanacaktır.

Konuşma Hakkında
Milliyetçilik ve etnik merkezciliği kalıcı hale getiren hafıza müzelerinin, abidelerin ve  anma törenlerinin yenilenen anıtsallığına bir cevap olarak,  bu konuşma dünyanın farklı bölgelerinden feminist diaspora sanatçıları (Mirta Kupferminc ve Wangechi Muthu) tarafından yürütülen iki yakın dönem hafıza projesine değinecektir. Bu projeler sürgünün ve vatansızlığın değişimlerini ve de kırılganlıklarını araştırmaktadır. Konuşma, vatansız hafızanın günümüz özneleriyle vatandaşlık, ulusal aidiyet, vatan ve hatta oluşun farklı zamansallığı arasında alternatif ilişkileri hayal etmeyi mümkün kılabileceğini öne sürmektedir.
 
Marianne Hirsch, feminist teoriyi hafıza çalışmalarıyla küresel bir perspektiften birleştirerek, şiddet hafızasının kuşaktan kuşağa aktarımı üzerine yazmaktadır. Son kitapları arasında The Generation of Postmemory: Writing and Visual Culture After the Holocaust, (Hafıza-sonrası Kuşağı: Nazi Soykırımı Sonrası Yazım ve Görsel Kültür), Leo Spitzer ile birlikte yazdığı Ghosts of Home: The Afterlife of Czernowitz in Jewish Memory  (Memleketin Hayaletleri: Czernowitz’in Yahudi Hafızasındaki İzleri) yer almaktadır. Bu yıl çıkacak olan kitapları ise Spitzer ile birlikte derlediği Women Mobilizing Memory (Hafızayı Harekete Geçiren Kadınlar) ve Spitzer ile birlikte yazdığı School Photos in Liquid Time (Akışkan Zamanda Okul Fotoğrafları)’dır. Columbia Üniversitesi Toplumsal Farklılık Çalışmaları Merkezi’nin direktörü olan Hirsch Columbia Üniversitesi’nde Karşılaştırmalı Edebiyat ve Toplumsal Cinsiyet Çalışmaları dersleri vermektedir.

RSVP here.

This event will take place at Columbia University's Studio-X Istanbul in Salıpazarı. 
Etkinlik Columbia Üniversitesi'nin Salıpazarı'nda bulunan Studio-X Istanbul ofisinde gerçekleşecektir.

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Corporate Feminism & Its Discontents
Mar
13
6:00 PM18:00

Corporate Feminism & Its Discontents


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Women Creating Change presents:
Corporate Feminism and Its Discontents  

Wednesday, March 13, 2019 | 6:15pm - 8pm
Columbia University - Maison Francaise, East Gallery
Special thanks to our cosponsors Center for Gender and Sexuality Law and Maison Francaise

Description

Despite gains in recent years, gender and racial disparities in the corporate sector, especially in its higher echelons, remain significant in the United States and Europe. This round table will explore successes and limitations of policies to promote diversity and inclusion. Panelists will identify successful strategies but also roadblocks and unintended consequences, and raise the issue of how backlash and stasis might be addressed. 

Speakers

Janice Ellig, Chief Executive Officer, Ellig Group
Yasmine Ergas, Director of the Specialization on Gender and Public Policy, School for International and Public Affairs and Director of Gender and Human Rights at the Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University
Melissa Fisher, Visiting Scholar, Institute for Public Knowledge, New York University, Author of Wall Street Women & member of the Women Creating Change Leadership Council 
Katherine Phillips, Reuben Mark Professor of Organizational Character Management and Director
Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. Center for Leadership and Ethics

Click here to read a recent New York Times Magazine interview featuring panelist Katherine Phillips on women in corporations.

The event is free and open to the public, please register here.

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Our History is the Future With Nick Estes
Mar
6
6:30 PM18:30

Our History is the Future With Nick Estes

Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance by Nick Estes

In 2016, a small protest encampment at the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota, initially established to block construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline, grew to be the largest Indigenous protest movement in the twenty-first century. Water Protectors knew this battle for native sovereignty had already been fought many times before, and that, even after the encampment was gone, their anticolonial struggle would continue. In Our History Is the Future, Nick Estes traces traditions of Indigenous resistance that led to the #NoDAPL movement. Our History Is the Future is at once a work of history, a manifesto, and an intergenerational story of resistance.

Nick Estes is a citizen of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe and an Assistant Professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico.

Our History is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance is available from Verso

Co-sponsored by the Racial Capitalism Working Group, the Center for the Study of Social Difference, Columbia University, Barnard’s New Directions in American Studies, Verso Books, and The People’s Forum.

Register on Facebook.

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Queer Disruptions III
Feb
28
to Mar 1

Queer Disruptions III

  • The Forum at Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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This will be the third year of Queer Disruptions (QD3), and this year an international slate of esteemed scholars, activists, and artists will convene to celebrate GLQ’s 25th anniversary and to reflect on the seminal conference Black Nations/Queer Nations from 1995.

Prior to the start of the conference, we invite you to a concert performance by queer Colombian sound artist Ana Maria Romano on Wednesday, February 27, organized by the Department of Music and the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race at Columbia University. The performance will serve as an opening to what is sure to be a dynamic and enriching discussion during QD3.

This program is hosted by the Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies Council at Columbia University in the City of New York and sponsored by the Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty Diversity and Inclusion.

Additional support provided by the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality, the Center for Gender and Sexuality Law at Columbia Law School, the Center for the Study of Social Difference, the Barnard Center for Research on Women, and the Program for the Study of LGBT Health.

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION AVAILABLE HERE.

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Pre-Conference Programming | Wednesday, Feb 27, 2019

Here and Queer in Networked Space: A conversation with Zach Stafford and Jack Halberstam
moderated by Mark Hansen

5:00-6:30 pm
Brown Institute for Media Innovation
Pulitzer Hall, ground floor

Ana Maria Romano Concert and Discussion
Free and Open to the Public
7:30pm (doors at 7:15)
Katharina Otto-Bernstein Screening Room, Lenfest Center for the Arts, 615 West 129th Street, between Broadway and 12th Avenue

Thursday, Feb 28, 2019

 4pm-6pm The Forum

Black Nations/Queer Nations
Kendall Thomas (Columbia Law School), moderator
Cathy Cohen (University of Chicago)
Chandan Reddy (University of Washington)
Rinaldo Walcott (University of Toronto)

 6pm-8pm The Forum
Conference Reception

Friday, March 1, 2019

 10am-11:30am | The Forum

NYC Queer History and Theory
Tey Meadow (Columbia University), moderator
Kenyon Farrow (Independent Writer/Activist)
Katherine Franke (Columbia Law School)
George Chauncey (Columbia University)

 11:30am-12:45pm | The Forum
Lunch

 1pm-2:30pm | The Forum

Queer Art/Queer Theory
Tavia Nyong’o (Yale University), moderator
Iván Ramos (University of Maryland, College Park)
Xandra Ibarra (Independent Artist)
Kara Keeling (University of Chicago)

 3pm-4:30pm | The Forum

Queer/Trans Intersections
Vanessa Agard-Jones (Columbia University), moderator
Marquis Bey (Cornell University)
Dora Silva Santana (John Jay College – CUNY)
Aren Aizura (University of Minnesota)
Boychild (Independent Artist)

 8:30pm-10:30pm | KGB Bar, The Red Room (85 E 4th St, New York, NY 10003)

Trans/gression: An Evening of Performance
Curated by Kiyan Williams
Performances by Linda Labeija and NIC Kay

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Book Launch:  Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad
Feb
27
6:30 PM18:30

Book Launch: Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad

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CSSD working group Racial Capitalism co-sponsors the launch of Manu Karuka’s new book. Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad (University of California Press, 2019).

Karuka’s book boldly reframes the history of the transcontinental railroad from the perspectives of the Cheyenne, Lakota, and Pawnee Native American tribes, and the Chinese migrants who toiled on its path. In this meticulously researched book, Manu Karuka situates the railroad within the violent global histories of colonialism and capitalism. Through an examination of legislative, military, and business records, Karuka deftly explains the imperial foundations of U.S. political economy. Tracing the shared paths of Indigenous and Asian American histories, this multisited interdisciplinary study connects military occupation to exclusionary border policies, a linked chain spanning the heart of U.S. imperialism. This highly original and beautifully wrought book unveils how the transcontinental railroad laid the tracks of the U.S. Empire.

Click here to RSVP.

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Precision Medicine: Ethics, Politics, and Culture
Feb
19
5:00 PM17:00

Precision Medicine: Ethics, Politics, and Culture

Molecular Death, Desire, and Redface Reincarnation:
Indigenous Appropriations in the USA and Canada

The Precision Medicine: Ethics, Politics, and Culture Project, co-sponsored by Precision Medicine & Society and the Center for the Study of Social Difference, welcomes Dr. Kim TallBear (University of Alberta) to give a talk on "Molecular Death, Desire, and Redface Reincarnation: Indigenous Appropriateness in the USA and Canada", on Tuesday, February 19th, 5pm-7pm, in the Seminar Room (IRWGS), 754 Schermerhorn Ext, 1200 Amsterdam Ave, New York, NY 10027.

Subscribe to our youtube channel to watch more videos like this!

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The event is open to the public and co-sponsored by Columbia University's Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality (IRWGS); Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race (CSER); the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities. The talk will be followed by a small reception. 

The Precision Medicine: Ethics, Politics, and Culture Project is co-directed by Rachel Adams, PhD, Professor of English; and Maya Sabatello, LLB, PhD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Bioethics. For more information on this project, please visit socialdifference.columbia.edu

Columbia University is committed to creating an environment that includes and welcomes people with disabilities. If you need accommodations because of a disability, please email Srishti Sardana at ss4677@tc.columbia.edu as soon as possible.

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Colonial Pasts and Violent Present of Confinement in Counterinsurgencies
Feb
12
6:30 PM18:30

Colonial Pasts and Violent Present of Confinement in Counterinsurgencies

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CSSD working group Racial Capitalism co-sponsors Colonial Pasts and Violent Present of Confinement in Counterinsurgencies with Laleh Khalili, Professor of Middle East Politics SOAS University of London, on the evolution of modern regimes.

Detention and confinement— both of combatants and large groups of civilians—have become fixtures of asymmetric wars over the course of the last century, with a huge increase in the employment of detention camps, internment centres, and the enclosure or isolation of groups of people. Khalili examines the practices and historical roots of two major liberal counterinsurgencies of our day – the Israeli occupation of Palestine and the U.S. War on Terror. She argues that although practices of incarceration have been defended by the assertion that they constitute measures to “protect” populations against violence and terrorism, liberal states have in fact consistently acted illiberally in their confinements, and that this has increasingly encouraged policymakers willingly to choose to wage wars.

There will be a reception after the talk.

Additional co-sponsorship by the Center for Social Difference, Columbia University, Barnard’s New Directions in American Studies, Verso Books, and the People’s Forum.

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Unsettling Spaces
Feb
12
12:00 PM12:00

Unsettling Spaces

Technologies of Violence in Palestinian Jerusalem

with Religion and the Global Framing of Gender Violence co-director
Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian

Unsettling Spaces

Moderated by Prof. Nadia Abu el-Haj
Department of Anthropology
Co-Director, Center for Palestine Studies
Columbia University

Presentations:

Speaking Life, Speaking Death: Jerusalem’s Children in the “Showroom” of Violent Technologies

Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Chair in Global Law, Queen Mary University of London and Lawrence D Biele Chair in Law, The Hebrew University in Jerusalem

Who speaks life and who speaks death in Occupied East Jerusalem? Children’s words and acts provide unique insight into the daily experiences of domination, colonization and occupation that are part of Israel’s "combat proven" politics. Surveillance, spatial control, imprisonment, torture, and professional training of security personnel have turned the old city into a showroom for states, arms companies, and security agencies to market their technologies as tested, and "combat proven." From over 600 letters written by children in the old city and observations of their daily walks to school, we can learn about the effects and refusals of these technologies of violence as they speak life. The geostrategic significance of controlling Jerusalem for Israel and the sacralized politics invoked to turn it into a “show room” speak death.

Settler-Colonial “Displaceability”: Living Behind the Wall in Jerusalem

Nayrouz Abu Hatoum, Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Palestine Studies, Columbia University

Kufr Aqab, a neighborhood in Jerusalem that was cut off from the city after the construction of the Israeli wall in 2003 has been increasingly neglected by the Jerusalem municipality. In administrative and legal limbo, outside the reach of both Israeli state and the Palestinian Authority, Palestinian neighborhoods like Kufr Aqab are frontiers on which the contours of Israeli settler-colonial geography and demography are being drawn. Palestinians live there in a liminal zone facing the realities of disposability, displaceability, and infrastructural catastrophe. How do Palestinians live and thrive in such grey zones of colonial legality? Does dwelling in-between open up grounds for imagining a new (sovereign) future?


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Tankers, Tycoons, and the Making of Modern Regimes of Law, Labour, and Finance
Feb
11
6:00 PM18:00

Tankers, Tycoons, and the Making of Modern Regimes of Law, Labour, and Finance

CSSD working group Racial Capitalism presents Tankers, Tycoons, and the Making of Modern Regimes of Law, Labour, and Finance, an evening talk with Laleh Khalili, Professor of Middle East Politics SOAS University of London, on the evolution of modern regimes.

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Event is FREE. Click here for more information.

Additional support for this event is provided by the Department of Anthropology, Institute of Religion, Culture, and Public Life, The Racial Capitalism Working Group, Department of Middle East, South Asian, and African Studies, and the Middle East Institute.




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Religion and Public Health Series: Religion and Menstruation
Feb
11
11:30 AM11:30

Religion and Public Health Series: Religion and Menstruation

  • Hammer Science Building, Room 401 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please note, the location of this event has changed. It will now be held at:
Hammer Science Building, Room 401 
701 W 168th St, NYC 10032

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Description

A series to explore public health topics through the lens of different religious faiths. This event is co-sponsored by the Mailman School of Public Health, the Office of Diversity, Culture and Inclusion, and the Center for the Study of Social Difference working group Menstrual Health & Gender Justice.

Register here.

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