2019-2020

Filtering by: 2019-2020
The Hosting State and Its Restless Guests: Refugee Education, Migration and Regional Peace in the Global South
Oct
24
to Oct 25

The Hosting State and Its Restless Guests: Refugee Education, Migration and Regional Peace in the Global South

  • James Room, Barnard Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The 6th Georg Arnhold Symposium will explore the relationship between refugee hosting and refugee education in large refugee hosting states in the Global South in light of global policy shifts that attempt to stem secondary movement.

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Should You Be Worried about Racialization of Precision Medicine? Insights from Asia and North America
Dec
4
5:00 PM17:00

Should You Be Worried about Racialization of Precision Medicine? Insights from Asia and North America

The Precision Medicine: Ethics, Politics, and Culture Project welcomes Dr. Shirley Sun (Nanyang Technological University) to give a talk on “Should You Be Worried about Racialization of Precision Medicine? Insights from Asia and North America.”

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#MeToo: One Year After Christine Blasey Ford
Oct
9
5:30 PM17:30

#MeToo: One Year After Christine Blasey Ford

Join us for a lively discussion of the #Me Too movement, with contributors to Indelible in the Hippocampus: Writings from the Me Too Movement. Moderated by Davia Temin.

We regret the conflict with Yom Kippur and will share documentation of the event at a later date and continue the important #MeToo conversation.

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Period. End of Sentence. Film Screening and Critical Panel
Sep
26
6:00 PM18:00

Period. End of Sentence. Film Screening and Critical Panel

Please join the Menstrual Health and Gender Justice Working Group for a screening of 'PERIOD. End of Sentence,' the Oscar-winning documentary about menstruation. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion.


Panelists include:

Lauren Houghton, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Shobita Parthasarathy, Professor of Public Policy at University of Michigan's Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy

Emily Hoppes, Program and Partnerships Coordinator at Huru International

While the film focuses on the production of pads, ensuring menstrual health requires reaching far beyond that. Our panel will address critical questions related to menstrual stigma, agency, and power relations. How can we use the current attention to menstruation to bring about transformative change that advances gender justice?

Co-sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Human Rights and the Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality

Event Contact Information:
Michelle Chouinard
mc4225@columbia.edu

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Ecologies of Remembrance: The Material Afterlives of Unidentified Death along the Central Mediterranean Migration Route
Sep
11
to Sep 12

Ecologies of Remembrance: The Material Afterlives of Unidentified Death along the Central Mediterranean Migration Route

  • Sulzberger Parlor, Barnard Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The news media around the Mediterranean are frequently dominated by the aftermath of maritime disasters in which dozens, sometimes hundreds of migrants die on the perilous crossing to southern Italy from North Africa. Whilst migrant death is a recurring subject in academic study and journalism, scarcely any research is carried out on the ground into the material and symbolic treatment of unidentified human remains. Yet the social afterlife of human remains is of immense importance in the case of migrant deaths because of the ways in which they bring into focus the webs of relations in which migrants are caught, bringing together transnational kinship networks, local landscapes, local communities and solidarity groups and wider political motivations and actions.

How do people dispose of the anonymous remains of such disasters? What kinds of social relationships and connections are generated by the process? What are their motivations and emotional involvements of the people concerned? And what are the historical resonances of these unique and complex mortuary practices? What are the political consequences of the sacralization of the loss of human life juxtaposed against the normalization of the bare life existence of displaced people? We bring together research papers on works of tracing, forensic investigation, and burial, connecting metropolitan centers with Tunisia, Sicily, Lampedusa and Calabria. This way, we intend our conference to demonstrate the entanglements between transnational kin networks, local landscapes and communities, religious and solidarity groups, and national and international political discourses. Through the exploration of mourning without kin, this conference will follow the trail of sorrow and justice, local ritual appeasing and burial of migrant remains. 

Schedule:

Wednesday, September 11, 2019
3:30PM | Panel I
AFTERLIVES OF UNIDENTIFIED DEATH ALONG THE MIGRANT ROUTE
Agnès S. Callamard, Vanessa Grotti, Yannis Hamilakis, Matthew Engelke

6:30PM | Film Screening
IT WILL BE CHAOS
with filmmakers Lorena Luciano & Filippo Piscopo

Thursday, September 12, 2019
9:00AM | Panel II
BODIES AND LANDSCAPES
Marc, Brightman, Osman Balkan, Sarah Wagner

11:00AM | Panel III
VICISSITUDES OF REMAINS
Noar Ben-Yehoyada, Valentina Zagaria, Zoë Crossland

1:30PM | Panel IV
MOBILIZATION, CONTESTATION, ADVOCACY
J.C. Salyer, Leah Zamore

3:30PM | Concluding Discussion
Zoë Crossland, Brian Boyd, Sarah Wagner, Vanessa Grotti

 
Ecologies of Remembrance poster - smaller.png
 

Participants:

Osman Balkan (Swathmore College)
Naor Ben-Yehoyada (Anthropology, Columbia)
Brian Boyd (Anthropology, Columbia)
Marc Brightman (University of Bologna)
Agnès S. Callamard (Columbia, UN-OHCHR)
Zoë Crossland (Anthropology, Columbia)
Matthew Engelke (Religion, Columbia)
Vanessa Grotti (European University Institute)
Yannis Hamilakis (Anthropology, Brown)
Lorena Luciano (Director, It Will Be Chaos)
Filippo Piscopo (Director, It Will Be Chaos)
J.C. Salyer (Anthropology and Human Rights, Barnard)
Sarah Wagner (Anthropology, George Washington University)
Valentina Zagaria (London School of Economics)
Leah Zamore (Center for International Cooperation, NYU)

The Conference is co-sponsored by the ISERP Conference Funding Grant, the Faculty Fellowship Program at the Heyman Center for the Humanities, The Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life, the Anthropology Department, the CSSD Working Group on Migrant Personhood and Rights: A Crisis of Recognition, the Columbia Center for Archaeology, and the Barnard Human Rights Program. It continues a Wenner-Gren funded research project co-directed by Vanessa Grotti and Marc Brightman, in which Naor Ben-Yehoyada is collaborating.

Register here

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